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Image Amount of water in grass
The amount of grass that would provide the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of calcium also contains 350mls water, which is an important consideration, especially for rabbits with urinary tract disease.
Located in Media / Diet
Image Mineral blocks ( 1/19)
Mineral blocks can provide an alarmingly high amount of calcium to rabbits that chew large amounts. The calcium content is approximately 19% and there is very little water. A rabbit would only need to eat a nineteenth of one of the bars shown in this image to meet the Recommended Daily Allowance of 500mg. If the rabbit chews large amounts, it places a high burden on the kidneys and bladder to excrete the large amount of calcium. This would be alright in a rabbit with a healthy urinary tract but could easily cause problems in a rabbit with compromised kidney or bladder function. Another problem with mineral blocks is the small particle size of the powder. These particles will be moved into the caecum by the motility of the hindgut and could add to impaction problems in rabbits that are dehydrated or have consumed large amounts of the block. They also have a very low phosphorus content and a highly inverse calcium to phosphorus ratio.
Located in Media / Diet
Image SIS package Kidney stones and osteosclerosis
In rabbits, the kidneys regulate calcium metabolism by retaining or excreting it in the urine. Rabbits absorb calcium efficiently from the gut so if the kidneys are damaged, calcium excretion is impaired so calcium accumulates in the body and is laid down in a variety of tissues, including bone.The bones become very dense so they show clearly on radiographs (osteosclerosis). This is a feature of some rabbits with chronic renal failure. The rabbit in this radiograph has kidney stones. There is also gas in the caecum due to secondary gut stasis and calcification of the trachea and bronchi.
Located in Media / Radiographs / Abdominal radiographs
Image ECMAScript program Kidney stones
Located in Media / Radiographs / Abdominal radiographs
Image Octet Stream Inguinal hernia
Located in Media / Urogenital
Image Persistant urachus
Located in Media / Urogenital
Image chemical/x-ncbi-asn1-binary After perineal skin fold removal
Located in Media / Urogenital
Image Sludgy urine
This rabbit has a bladder full of sludge (dense white area) but there is also a deformity in its spinal column that is affecting its ability to urinate properly.
Located in Media / Urogenital
Image Normal rabbit urine
The colour of normal rabbit urine is variable. It may be any shade of yellow, orange, red or brown. It often contains calcium carbonate sediment. Excreting surplus calcium into the urine is the rabbit's way of regulating the amount of calcium in the body so the presence of sediment is normal.
Located in Media / Urogenital
Image Troff document Embryo in viable foetal unit
This embryo was inside a swelling in the uterus that was removed during routine ovariohysterectomy. Other swellings contained resorbing foetuses.
Located in Media / Urogenital