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Image JPEG image Umbellifer plant
Located in Media / / PLANT TOXICITY / HEMLOCK
Image JPEG image Umbelliferae
Umbelliferae are plants in the parsley or carrot family (Apiaceae). Most members are aromatic herbs with feathery leaves and white or light coloured flowers that are arranged in a conspicuous flat-topped clusters. Many of these plants are enjoyed by rabbits but identification is necessary as a few species are poisonous.
Located in Media / / PLANT TOXICITY / HEMLOCK
Image JPEG image Umbelliferae leaves
Located in Media / / PLANT TOXICITY / HEMLOCK
Image JPEG image Cow parsley- cut leaf stem
This picture shows a cross-section of a cut leaf stem of cow parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris). It shows the groove that is present. The shape is sometimes likened to a piece of celery.
Located in Media / / PLANT TOXICITY / HEMLOCK
Image JPEG image Cow parsley main stems
The main stems of cow parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris) are very different from poison hemlock (Conium maculatum). The main stems are ridged and slightly hairy with no blotches.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO LOOK FOR
Image JPEG image Cow parsley
Cow Parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris) is a short-lived perennial. It grows in grassland, along hedges and woodland edges, road verges, railway banks and wasteland. The foliage is one of the first plants to appear in the spring and last to disappear in autumn. It is safe and palatable for rabbits but there is always a concern that the plant may be confused with hemlock (Conium maculatum)- see section on ‘Plant Toxicity’. Examination of the stems will confirm its identity as cow parsley.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO LOOK FOR
Image JPEG image Hogweed seed heads
Once Hogweed has set seed the plant dries and the seeds fall away. The seeds can be scattered in the garden and will grow in rough areas. It can stand mowing. The leaves that regrow after mowing are easy to pick and make good rabbit food.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO LOOK FOR
Image JPEG image Rough chervil stem
Differentiating Rough Chervil (Chaerophyllum temulum) from hemlock (Conium maculatum) is a cause of concern for foragers but examination of the stem will confirm that the plant is not hemlock. The leaf stems are green to greenish purple, hairy and have a groove in them.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO LOOK FOR
Image JPEG image Sweet Cicely
Sweet Cicely (Myrrhis odorata) is a umbelliferous plant with feathery leaves and white flowers. It is a perennial plant that grows on grassy banks, verges and and woodland areas. At first glance, it is similar to Hemlock and Cow Parsley but the leaves are a lighter, brighter green and smell strongly of aniseed when crushed. They often have grey marks on them (see separate picture). The stems are grooved. Sweet cicely is palatable for rabbits but it is not a common plant so care should be taken to only pick from places where the plants are abundant.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO LOOK FOR
Image JPEG image Sweet cicely leaves
The leaves of Sweet cicely not only smell of aniseed when crushed but also often have grey 'splashes' on them that differentiates them from hemlock.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO LOOK FOR