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Image JPEG image Clump of hemlock
Hemlock may grow in clumps on roadsides, waste ground, field edges, path edges, meadows, and poorly drained soil near streams or ditches. This photograph was taken in a field next to a river near York in July.
Located in Media / / PLANT TOXICITY / HEMLOCK
Image JPEG image Hemlock
Hemlock (Conium maculatum) is a biennial plant that grows in damp areas and also on drier rough grassland, roadsides, and disturbed ground. It is the plant everyone worries about picking. Hemlock looks very similar to Cow Parsley, Rough Chervil and Sweet Cicely. Close inspection of the stems shows they are different. The plant is tall. It can grow up to 2 metres high.
Located in Media / / PLANT TOXICITY / HEMLOCK
Image JPEG image Bryony
Bryony (Bryonia dioica) is a climbing plants that can be found in hedgerows mixed with other plants. It is toxic to humans and can cause skin irritation if juices from the plant come in contact with the skin. It is definitely a plant to avoid picking.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO AVOID
Image JPEG image Bryony flowers
A close up image of the flowers of bryony (Bryonia dioica).
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO AVOID
Image JPEG image Bryony- a climbing plant
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO AVOID
Image JPEG image Burdock
Two types of burdock, Greater burdock (Arctium minus) and Lesser burdock (Arctium lappa) may be found on waste ground, verges and hedgerows. The picture shows Greater Burdock. It is a large plant with big leaves. The seed heads can be a nuisance as they stick to clothes and animals. It is not palatable to rabbits. A plant to be avoided.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO AVOID
Image Pascal source code Buttercup
The leaves in this image belong to the Creeping Buttercup (Ranunculus repens). There are many types of buttercups and other Ranunculus species. They are not worth picking for rabbits although it won't matter if a leaf or too get among a mixture of other plants that are offered. Buttercups are often included in lists of plants that are poisonous to rabbits but their acrid taste means the plants are usually left uneaten. In other species, poisoning can occur where buttercups are all that is left in overgrazed fields and the animals eat them out of desperation. No cases of toxicity in rabbits have been reported. The toxic principle is protoanemonin, which is released when the plant is crushed. It is a volatile, bitter, yellow oil that is prone to spontaneous polymerization to yield innocuous anemonin. Protoanemonin is degraded by drying, so hay containing dried buttercups is safe.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO AVOID
Image JPEG image Celery leaved buttercup
Celery leaved buttercup (Ranunculus scleratus) grows in wet and moist places, such as ponds and streambanks. It classed as toxic to humans because it contains an irritant that can cause blisters in humans that touch it. There are no reports of problems with rabbits.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO AVOID
Image JPEG image Cherry leaves
Wild cherry (Prunus avium) is a common tree in UK. The leaves contain cyanogenic glycoside. The leaves, twigs and branches should not be offered to rabbits.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO AVOID
Image JPEG image Dock (Old leaves)
Rabbits find old dock (Rumex obtusifolius) leaves less palatable than the young ones. The older leaves tend to gain a red colour and usually have scars on them. They are not worth picking and it is unlikely the rabbits will eat them. Dock leaves contain oxalic acid which could be hazardous if consumed in larger quantities.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO AVOID