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Image Liver lobe torson
This image shows the liver of a rabbit that died from a torsion of the caudal process of the caudal lobe of the liver (arrow).
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image Cystic liver
Biliary cysts occasionally occur in rabbits. They are usually benign but may become calcified so they are visible on abdominal radiographs
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image SIS package Hepatic lipidosis
Hepatic lipidosis is the end point of untreated gut stasis. Fat is broken down as an energy source and is broken down by beta-oxidation in the liver. A metabolic bottleneck occurs and ketoacidosis is the result. Affected rabbits die from liver and/or kidney failure. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy may occur. Gastric ulceration is another feature of untreated gut stasis. This image shows the appearance of the liver and stomach of a rabbit that died from hepatic lipidosis: the liver is very pale and the dark areas on the stomach are ulcers. The primary problem was a dental spur.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image SIS package Hepatic lipidosis
This image shows the liver of a rabbit that died with hepatic lipidosis. She died a few hours after admission, despite intravenous fluids and other supportive treatment. She was ataxic and hypothermic with a low blood glucose (4.2 mmol/l) on admission. Her urine was acidic on a dipstick due to ketoacidosis. The rabbit had undergone radical dentistry at another practice 4 days earlier and had not eaten since she was discharged on the day of dentistry.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image Liver from a normal rabbit
A post mortem examination showing the liver form a normal rabbit. The edges are sharp the surface colour is relatively homogenous but when examined closely the lobules can be seen. It can be difficult to prevent hair form drifting onto the surface of organs during this type of examination.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image Liver from a rabbit that died from RHD2
This liver was seen at post-mortem examination of a young rabbit that was found dead. There had been many rabbits in this area but there had been a population 'crash'. A request was made for a diagnosis. The liver is enlarged and is pale with patches of congestion (increased blood). It is very suggestive of RHD2
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image Eimeria steidae
The external surface of a liver lobe from a rabbit that died with RHD2. The liver is abnormally congested with blood but a local area of white tissue is identifiable. This coauld have a number of causes so the liver lobe was cut at this level.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image A ventral view of the inital appearance of a rabbit with RHD at post-mortem examination
This half grown female wild rabbit was found having died suddenly. There were no signs of external injury. Post-mortem examination revealed a full gastrointestinal tract - the rabbit had been eating up until an hour or two before death. The liver was enlarged and mottled, the lungs contained several haemorrhages.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image Eimeria steidae
The freshly cut section of liver of a young male wild rabbit that died from RDH2, shows several areas of fibrosis involving the bile ducts. There is also a normal bile duct running across the section. This appearance is very suggestive of hepatic coccidiosis. Cytology can be used to confirm the presence of coccidial oocysts. Histology will also show the oocysts as well as showing the typical changes produced by RHD. A pcr test for rhd/rhd2 is required to confirm the presence of this viral disease.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image SIS package Hepatic lipidosis
This image shows the liver of a rabbit that died with hepatic lipidosis. She died a few hours after admission, despite intravenous fluids and other supportive treatment. She was ataxic and hypothermic with a low blood glucose (4.2 mmol/l) on admission. Her urine was acidic on a dipstick due to ketoacidosis. The rabbit had undergone radical dentistry at another practice 4 days earlier and had not eaten since she was discharged on the day of dentistry.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images