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Image JPEG image Ash
Ash leaves are suitable for feeding to rabbits as part of a mixture of plants. Young shoots (as in picture) are palatable.
Located in Media / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Ash leaves
Branches and leaves from ash trees (Fraxinus excelsior) can be picked for rabbits. They are not poisonous.
Located in Media / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Sycamore leaves
Sycamores ( Acer pseudoplatanus) are common trees in UK. The leaves are not palatable to rabbits although they may like to eat the dried leaves as they fall in the autumn. The seeds and seedlings are toxic to horses if they eat too many. Sycamore is not a good plant to pick for rabbits.
Located in Media / Plants / Plants to avoid
Image JPEG image Sweet chestnut leaves
Sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa) leaves are not toxic but are not favourites for rabbits either.
Located in Media / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Cherry leaves
Wild cherry (Prunus avium) is a common tree in UK. The leaves contain cyanogenic glycoside. The leaves, twigs and branches should not be offered to rabbits.
Located in Media / Plants / Plants to avoid
Image JPEG image Birch leaves
Several types of birch tree (Betula spp.) are found in UK. These leaves are of from a Downy birch tree (Betula pubescens). The leaves and non toxic but not a favourite with rabbits. The branches and twigs may be offered for them to gnaw on.
Located in Media / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Oak leaves
Oak leaves contain tannins although the content varies with the season. There are high concentrations in acorns. In moderation, tannins are not poisonous. They are present in tea. Rabbits will not be harmed if they eat some oak leaves, although they are not a good choice to pick when foraging. It is sensible to avoid feeding acorns although wild rabbits seem to enjoy them without coming to any harm.
Located in Media / Plants / Plants to avoid
Image JPEG image Blackthorn
Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa) is a commin hedgerow plant. It produces purple berries (sloes). The stems have vicious spines. The leaves are suitable for feeding rabbits although it varies in palatibility. Suitable for drying for winter.
Located in Media / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image Pascal source code Buttercup
The leaves in this image belong to the Creeping Buttercup (Ranunculus repens). There are many types of buttercups and other Ranunculus species. They are not worth picking for rabbits although it won't matter if a leaf or too get among a mixture of other plants that are offered. Buttercups are often included in lists of plants that are poisonous to rabbits but their acrid taste means the plants are usually left uneaten. In other species, poisoning can occur where buttercups are all that is left in overgrazed fields and the animals eat them out of desperation. No cases of toxicity in rabbits have been reported. The toxic principle is protoanemonin, which is released when the plant is crushed. It is a volatile, bitter, yellow oil that is prone to spontaneous polymerization to yield innocuous anemonin. Protoanemonin is degraded by drying, so hay containing dried buttercups is safe.
Located in Media / Plants / Plants to avoid
Image ECMAScript program Foxglove leaves
Foxgloves (Digitalis purpurea) are common hedgerow plants that are easy to recognise when they are in flower. It is a biennial plant and in the first year, it forms a clump or rosette of leaves ( see photo). In the second year, this rosette produces the flower spike – which may be up to 2 metres in height. All parts of the plant, including the roots and seeds, may contain the cardiac glycoside, digitalis. It is inadvisable to pick foxgloves leaves for rabbits although it is unlikely that the rabbits will eat them. Wild rabbits will sometimes nibble the edges of the leaves before they leave them alone.
Located in Media / Plants / Plants to avoid