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Image JPEG image Ash
Ash leaves are suitable for feeding to rabbits as part of a mixture of plants. Young shoots (as in picture) are palatable.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO LOOK FOR
Image JPEG image Dandelions
Dandelions (Taraxacum officinale) are the most popular forage plant for rabbits. They can be found on verges, wasteland, meadows gardens, woodland and other places.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO LOOK FOR
Image JPEG image Hawthorn leaves
Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) is a favourite with rabbits, especially in the spring when the new leaves appear. The thorns can be a problem although they are not present on new growth so the leaves can be stripped off easily. Alternatively, twigs cut be cut and offered to the rabbit. The thorns don't pose a problem to them
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO LOOK FOR
Image ECMAScript program Hogweed- new leaves
These are young leaves of Hogweed (Heracleum sphondylium). They will grow in verges that have been mown and are very palatable
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO LOOK FOR
Image ECMAScript program Pear tree leaves
Pear trees (Pyrus sp) are a favourite fo rabbits. They enjoy the windfalls in the autumn and also the autumn leaves as they fall. Twigs and leaves from the tree can be offered at any time of year. The leaves can be dried and stored for winter.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO LOOK FOR
Image JPEG image Sweet cicely leaves
The leaves of Sweet cicely not only smell of aniseed when crushed but also often have grey 'splashes' on them that differentiates them from hemlock.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO LOOK FOR
Image JPEG image Willow (goat willow) leaves
Goat willow (Salix caprea) is sometimes called pussy willow. It is a commonly found in woodland and hedges. Unlike most willows, the leaves are oval rather than long and thin. A good plant to offer rabbits.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO LOOK FOR
Image ECMAScript program Weeping willow leaves
This photo shows the characteristic long leaves from the weeping willow. A firm favourite with rabbits.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO LOOK FOR
Image Pascal source code Buttercup
The leaves in this image belong to the Creeping Buttercup (Ranunculus repens). There are many types of buttercups and other Ranunculus species. They are not worth picking for rabbits although it won't matter if a leaf or too get among a mixture of other plants that are offered. Buttercups are often included in lists of plants that are poisonous to rabbits but their acrid taste means the plants are usually left uneaten. In other species, poisoning can occur where buttercups are all that is left in overgrazed fields and the animals eat them out of desperation. No cases of toxicity in rabbits have been reported. The toxic principle is protoanemonin, which is released when the plant is crushed. It is a volatile, bitter, yellow oil that is prone to spontaneous polymerization to yield innocuous anemonin. Protoanemonin is degraded by drying, so hay containing dried buttercups is safe.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO AVOID
Image JPEG image Cherry leaves
Wild cherry (Prunus avium) is a common tree in UK. The leaves contain cyanogenic glycoside. The leaves, twigs and branches should not be offered to rabbits.
Located in Media / / FORAGING / PLANTS TO AVOID