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Image Troff document Fat rabbit
This rabbit was so fat she was unable to hop, or to groom herself.
Located in Media / Miscellaneous pictures
Image Enterotoxaemia
Enterotoxaemia is characterised by inflammation of the caecum ( and sometimes other parts of the intestinal tract. The contents of the caecum are liquid and haemorrhagic
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image Small intestinal tympany
If the small intestine becomes occluded by a foreign body (often a pellet of compressed fur, yellow arrow), the stomach (white arrow) and small intestine that is proximal to the obstruction (turquoise arrow) become dilated and tympanitic and the intestine that is distal to the obstruction is collapsed and empty.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image Gastric dilation
Gastric dilation is a feature of intestinal obstruction. The stomach can be grossly distended with gas and fluid so it becomes inflamed
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image SIS package Hepatic lipidosis
Hepatic lipidosis is the end point of untreated gut stasis. Fat is broken down as an energy source and is broken down by beta-oxidation in the liver. A metabolic bottleneck occurs and ketoacidosis is the result. Affected rabbits die from liver and/or kidney failure. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy may occur. Gastric ulceration is another feature of untreated gut stasis. This image shows the appearance of the liver and stomach of a rabbit that died from hepatic lipidosis: the liver is very pale and the dark areas on the stomach are ulcers. The primary problem was a dental spur.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image SIS package Hepatic lipidosis
This image shows the liver of a rabbit that died with hepatic lipidosis. She died a few hours after admission, despite intravenous fluids and other supportive treatment. She was ataxic and hypothermic with a low blood glucose (4.2 mmol/l) on admission. Her urine was acidic on a dipstick due to ketoacidosis. The rabbit had undergone radical dentistry at another practice 4 days earlier and had not eaten since she was discharged on the day of dentistry.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image SIS package End point of gut stasis
This picture shows the abdominal organs of a fat rabbit that had died with gut stasis. He died shortly after admission. The rabbit had not eaten for several days because of a spur on one of his teeth that was discovered during post-mortem examination. The picture shows a pale fatty liver, a small stomach, an empty caecum distended with gas and empty gas filled intestines. There is also a lot of abdominal fat. Rabbits that are overweight are more likely to die sooner with gut stasis because there is fat in the liver already. However death is not sudden. It takes at least 3 days for the rabbit to die. Death can be prevented by providing food and fluid (syringe feeding) and medication to stimulate gut motility. Treatment of the cause of gut stasis (in this case dentistry) is also necessary.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image SIS package Hepatic lipidosis
This image shows the liver of a rabbit that died with hepatic lipidosis. She died a few hours after admission, despite intravenous fluids and other supportive treatment. She was ataxic and hypothermic with a low blood glucose (4.2 mmol/l) on admission. Her urine was acidic on a dipstick due to ketoacidosis. The rabbit had undergone radical dentistry at another practice 4 days earlier and had not eaten since she was discharged on the day of dentistry.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image Baby rabbit eating grass
Although it is often recommended that young rabbits should not eat any leafy green foods until they are 6 months old, the advice doesn't make sense. It may apply to rabbits kept in crowded conditions with a low fibre diet and many environmental pathogens but for rabbits with access to leafy green plants, it does not apply. Wild rabbits start to eat grass and other plants as soon as they emerge from the nest.
Located in Media / People and portraits
Image Mucoid enteropathy
Located in Media / Radiographs