Search results

14 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type






















New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
Image Rabbit with dental disease
This rabbit was found as a stray with severe tongue damage due to spurs on the cheek teeth and a dental abscess. He started to eat as soon as he recovered from the anaesthetic to treat these conditions.
Located in Media / People and portraits
Image Pus in the eye
This rabbit had severe dacryocystitis secondary to dental disease. Infection had spread into the eye itself.
Located in Media / Eye disease
Image application/x-troff-ms Rabbit with potential problems
This rabbit has congenital incisor malocclusion. The upper and lower incisors will never meet or be functional. He also has a big fluffy coat that would be a problem for him to groom, even if his incisors were normal. Rabbits use their incisors like pincers to grasp dead hair and remove it from the fur. The rabbit also has spotted markings, which is linked with 'megacolon' syndrome although only a small proportion of them develop it. This rabbit is going to take a lot of care. and commitment to keep the area under his tail free from urine and uneaten caecotrophs. He will need regular grooming and trimming.
Located in Media / People and portraits
Image Troff document Intubated rabbit undergoing incisor removal
Located in Media / Procedures
Image Early dental disease
This radiograph shows apical elongation, which is first change to take place in PSADD. The apices of the cheek teeth are elongated and growing through the bone. The crowns of the teeth are not long. The
Located in Media / Radiographs / Skull radiographs
Image D source code Early dental disease-labelled
This image shows some of the characteristic features of early dental disease. There is apical elongation. The deree of apical elongation is not constistent in all the teeth. The yellow arrow points to an elongated root of a second mandibular cheek tooth that has perforated the mandibular bone and will be palpable as a swelling along the ventral border of the mandible. The blue arrow shows elongation of the maxillary cheek teeth that are filling the alveolar bulla. There is also evidence of enamel loss as the longitudinal lines of the central enamal folds in the mandibular cheek teeth are lost (green arrow)
Located in Media / Radiographs / Skull radiographs
Image Acquired incisor malocclusion
This lateral skull radiographs shows a rabbit with incisor malocclusion as part of the progressive syndrome of acquired dental disease (PSADD). The change in the relative position and shape of the upper and lower incisors has resulted in the teeth failing to meet and wear against each other. The shape and position of all the teeth has altered. There is apical elongation of all the teeth. The pulp cavities in the incisors are small. The occlusal surfaces of the cheek teeth have lost their normal zig zag appearance. The enamel folds in the centre of the teeth are indistinct or absent.
Located in Media / Radiographs / Skull radiographs
Image Advanced dental disease
This lateral skull radiograph of a Netherland Dwarf shows the typical changes of the advanced stages of dental disease. There is apical elongation of all the teeth. The occlusal relationship of the upper and lower teeth is abnormal. The teeth have an amorphous structure rather than having a distinct pulp cavity and lines of enamel. The white line (lamina dura) that outlines the socket is irregular or absent. These teeth will be growing slowly or not at all. There is contact between the upper and lower teeth so they will have some function but the teeth are not good enough to bite through hay and other tough foods.
Located in Media / Radiographs / Skull radiographs
Image Advanced dental disease
This radiograph shows many of the features of the later stages of PSADD. There is apical elongation, especially of the incisors. The apex of the upper incisor has penetrated the incisive bone. Some crowns have broken off the cheek teeth.
Located in Media / Radiographs / Skull radiographs
Image Root resorption in the later stages of dental disease
In some rabbits, the roots of the teeth resorb, rather than calcify in the later stages of the progressive syndrome of acquired dental disease (PSADD). This probably depends on the calcium status of the individual. The radiograph shows that many teeth have disappeared altogether. They have not been extracted. The remaining teeth have lost an amorphous structure with no enamel or surrounding alveolar bone. The shape and the position of the teeth are very abnormal. The rabbit had never been to a vet before. Radiography (or CT scanning) is necessary to see these changes.
Located in Media / Radiographs / Skull radiographs