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Image Rabbit moving hay
Located in Media / Behaviour
Image text/texmacs My rabbits
These rabbits lived together as a bonded trio for many years. There are two neutered males with a spayed female hand-reared wild rabbit.
Located in Media / Behaviour
Image Free food for rabbits
Located in Media / Diet
Image PS document Rabbit in buttercups
Buttercups are on many lists of poisonous plants. They contain an irritant that can cause dermatitis in humans that handle buttercups and salivation, oral ulceration and gastrointestinal irritation in animals that eat them. Buttercups have a bitter taste and are not a problem for rabbits. They can eat small, young leaves that are growing in pastureland without ill effects. The mature leaves, tall plants and flowers unpalatable to rabbits so they do not eat them.
Located in Media / Diet
Image Troff document Orphan baby rabbit
Frances's handreared wild rabbit 'Easter'
Located in Media / Miscellaneous pictures
Image Rudolf
Wild rabbit with an abscess on his nose
Located in Media / Miscellaneous pictures
Image Leo eating greens
Located in Media / Miscellaneous pictures
Image Troff document Chronically ill rabbit
Located in Media / People and portraits
Image C header Rabbit looking into a hutch
Located in Media / People and portraits
Image Baby rabbit eating grass
Although it is often recommended that young rabbits should not eat any leafy green foods until they are 6 months old, the advice doesn't make sense. It may apply to rabbits kept in crowded conditions with a low fibre diet and many environmental pathogens but for rabbits with access to leafy green plants, it does not apply. Wild rabbits start to eat grass and other plants as soon as they emerge from the nest.
Located in Media / People and portraits