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Image Troff document Obese rabbit
Located in Media / Images / Miscellaneous pictures
Image Conscious radiography
It is usually easy to take a well positioned lateral abdominal radiograph without sedation by quietly positioning the rabbit on its side and placing a sandbag across the neck. It is very important that there is noise or sudden movements and the rabbit is handled gently.
Located in Media / Images / Procedures
Image Syringe feeding
Located in Media / Images / Procedures
Image Liver lobe torson
This image shows the liver of a rabbit that died from a torsion of the caudal process of the caudal lobe of the liver (arrow).
Located in Media / / Pathology / Post-mortem images
Image SIS package Hepatic lipidosis
This image shows the liver of a rabbit that died with hepatic lipidosis. She died a few hours after admission, despite intravenous fluids and other supportive treatment. She was ataxic and hypothermic with a low blood glucose (4.2 mmol/l) on admission. Her urine was acidic on a dipstick due to ketoacidosis. The rabbit had undergone radical dentistry at another practice 4 days earlier and had not eaten since she was discharged on the day of dentistry.
Located in Media / / Pathology / Post-mortem images
Image SIS package Yersiniosis
Occasionally rabbits may be infected with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. During life, it causes vague clinical signs of anorexia and weight loss. At post-mortem examination , numerous white foci can be observed on the intestine, especially in the appendix ( white arrow) and sacculus rotundus (yellow arrow). Foci may also be seen in the spleen.
Located in Media / / Pathology / Post-mortem images
Image SIS package End point of gut stasis
This picture shows the abdominal organs of a fat rabbit that had died with gut stasis. He died shortly after admission. The rabbit had not eaten for several days because of a spur on one of his teeth that was discovered during post-mortem examination. The picture shows a pale fatty liver, a small stomach, an empty caecum distended with gas and empty gas filled intestines. There is also a lot of abdominal fat. Rabbits that are overweight are more likely to die sooner with gut stasis because there is fat in the liver already. However death is not sudden. It takes at least 3 days for the rabbit to die. Death can be prevented by providing food and fluid (syringe feeding) and medication to stimulate gut motility. Treatment of the cause of gut stasis (in this case dentistry) is also necessary.
Located in Media / / Pathology / Post-mortem images
Image SIS package Hepatic lipidosis
This image shows the liver of a rabbit that died with hepatic lipidosis. She died a few hours after admission, despite intravenous fluids and other supportive treatment. She was ataxic and hypothermic with a low blood glucose (4.2 mmol/l) on admission. Her urine was acidic on a dipstick due to ketoacidosis. The rabbit had undergone radical dentistry at another practice 4 days earlier and had not eaten since she was discharged on the day of dentistry.
Located in Media / / Pathology / Post-mortem images
Image Liver lobe torsion
This image shows the liver of a rabbit that had died from a liver lobe torsion. The caudal lobe has twisted around so the blood supply was cut off. The rest of the liver has fatty infiltration.
Located in Media / / Pathology / Post-mortem images