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Image A ventral view of the inital appearance of a rabbit with RHD at post-mortem examination
This half grown female wild rabbit was found having died suddenly. There were no signs of external injury. Post-mortem examination revealed a full gastrointestinal tract - the rabbit had been eating up until an hour or two before death. The liver was enlarged and mottled, the lungs contained several haemorrhages.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image An enlarged spleen in a rabbit with RHD2
The spleen must be found during a post-mortem examination. Lifting the stomach and reflecting it dorsolaterally the spleen can be found, attached to the stomach by the lesser omentum. In this case it is at least double the size it should be. This is a cardinal sign of RHD.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image Buzzard attack
This juvenile wild rabbit was found after a Common Buzzard was disturbed and flew into a tree that was close by. The body was warm and limp indicating that the rabbit had only just died. There were no visible marks or wounds on the body. After the skin was partially removed, four small tears were found that penetrated either the thorax or abdomen. One of these had caused substantial haemorrhage. These marks were consistent with wounds inflicted by talons. There was more severe damage internally.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image Cardiomyopathy
Heart with myocardial fibrosis
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image Eimeria steidae
The external surface of a liver lobe from a rabbit that died with RHD2. The liver is abnormally congested with blood but a local area of white tissue is identifiable. This coauld have a number of causes so the liver lobe was cut at this level.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image Eimeria steidae
The freshly cut section of liver of a young male wild rabbit that died from RDH2, shows several areas of fibrosis involving the bile ducts. There is also a normal bile duct running across the section. This appearance is very suggestive of hepatic coccidiosis. Cytology can be used to confirm the presence of coccidial oocysts. Histology will also show the oocysts as well as showing the typical changes produced by RHD. A pcr test for rhd/rhd2 is required to confirm the presence of this viral disease.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image Troff document Embryo in viable foetal unit
This embryo was inside a swelling in the uterus that was removed during routine ovariohysterectomy. Other swellings contained resorbing foetuses.
Located in Media / Urogenital
Image SIS package End point of gut stasis
This picture shows the abdominal organs of a fat rabbit that had died with gut stasis. He died shortly after admission. The rabbit had not eaten for several days because of a spur on one of his teeth that was discovered during post-mortem examination. The picture shows a pale fatty liver, a small stomach, an empty caecum distended with gas and empty gas filled intestines. There is also a lot of abdominal fat. Rabbits that are overweight are more likely to die sooner with gut stasis because there is fat in the liver already. However death is not sudden. It takes at least 3 days for the rabbit to die. Death can be prevented by providing food and fluid (syringe feeding) and medication to stimulate gut motility. Treatment of the cause of gut stasis (in this case dentistry) is also necessary.
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image Enterotoxaemia
Enterotoxaemia is characterised by inflammation of the caecum ( and sometimes other parts of the intestinal tract. The contents of the caecum are liquid and haemorrhagic
Located in Media / Post-mortem images
Image Filling lungs with formol saline
Located in Media / Post-mortem images