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Image JPEG image Wild carrot
Wild carrot (Daucus carota) is a member of the umbelliferae. It is widespread perennial plant of grasslands, particularly those on chalk soils, and coastlines. It appears later in the year tham some other umbelliferae. The stem is furrowed and can be hairy. The plant is edible for both humans and rabbits.
Located in Media / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Meadowsweet
Meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria) is a common plant that grows in damp places and ditches. It has white highly scented flowers. The roots contain salicylic acid. It was used to make aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid). It is suitable for feeding to rabbits.
Located in Media / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Coltsfoot
Coltsfoot (Tussilago farfara) is a plant that may be seen on verges or hard bare ground. The yellow flowers appear before the leaves and resemble dandelions although the seedhead is smaller. The leaves are large and angular and have the shape of a colt's (or foal's) footprint. The plant is used by herbalists. Can be picked for rabbits.
Located in Media / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Knapweed
Knapweed (Centaurea nigra) is a thistle-like plant (without thorns) that can be found on all kinds of grasslands from roadside verges to woodland rides, cliff tops to lawns. It is in bloom from June to September. It can be fed to rabbits
Located in Media / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Field Maple
Field Maple (Acer campestre) is a common hedgerow tree that grows and provides palatable leaves that rabbits may like to eat.
Located in Media / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image Goose grass
Goose grass (Gallium aparine) is also know as 'cleavers' or 'stickyweed' is common in hedgerows. It's long stems often grows over nettles. Although rabbits may enjoy eating the plant, it is not easy to handle. There is a risk of being stung by nettles and covering your clothes in sticky seeds. There are easier plants to pick. The easiest time to pick it is in early spring as it starts to grow.
Located in Media / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image ECMAScript program Hawthorn (with Berries)
Hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata) flowers in the spring with a strongly scented white or pale pink flower. The berries (haws) are bright red but rabbits do not eat them. Birds do, so the berries are better left on the bush for winter. No part of the plant is poisonous and can be picked at any time of the year althouth it is hampered by their thorny stems. New spring growth is not thorny and is among everyday plants to forage in the early spring when forage is scarce. Later in the year there are easier plants to pick.
Located in Media / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Hazel
Hazel (Corylus avellana) is common shrub or tree that grows in hedgerows and woods. It prefers moist lowland soils. Although, it is not a favourite, rabbits will eat the leaves, young shoots and in the autumn, the bark of more mature branches.
Located in Media / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image Troff document Forget-me-not
Forget-me-nots (Myosotis spp.) are perennial plants that spread easily. They self seed and thrive in shady spots but can adapt to full sun. The plants are non-toxic but rabbits seem to leave them alone
Located in Media / Plants / Garden plants and vegetables
Image JPEG image Vetch
Bush Vetch (Vicia sepium ) is common and eaten by rabbits. There are other varieties of vetch that are common on verges and other foraging sites. They can be picked and rabbits enjoy them when the leaves are young.
Located in Media / Plants / Wild plants and trees