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Image JPEG image Cow parsley stems
The stems of cow parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris) are different from poison hemlock (Conium maculatum). They are ridged and slightly hairy with no blotches. In cross section, the stems have a longitudinal ridge in them (like celery).
Located in Media / / Plants / Favourite plants
Image JPEG image Crab apple
There are wild and garden varieties of Crab apple (Malus sylvestris). The wild varieties host a variety of wildlife and should not be damaged. All parts of the tree will be enjoyed by rabbits but it is the fruit and the leaves that are most useful. The leaves can be harvested in the autumn when they are about to fall and fed fresh or dried for later in the winter.
Located in Media / / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Deadnettle and stinging nettle leaves
Deadnettle (Lamium spp) is similar in height and appearance to stinging nettles. It is advantagous to recognise the difference in the leaves, especially if you are not wearing gloves and you are foraging before the flowers appear. Deadnettles have smoother leaves and a green stem (white arrow). Stinging nettles leaves (red arrow) have a slightly furry appearance due to the stings. Deadnettles can be picked for rabbits.
Located in Media / / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Deadnettle flowers
The flowers of deadnettle may be white (Lamium album) as in this picture or red (Lamium purpureum). It is not poisonous for rabbits.
Located in Media / / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Deadnettle- red
Red deadnettle (Lamium purpureum) is a common wild plant that can be picked for rabbits. There are also many garden varieties. It flowers early. This photograph was taken at the end of March. The plant is growing among goosegrass seedlings.
Located in Media / / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Field Maple
Field Maple (Acer campestre) is a common hedgerow tree that grows and provides palatable leaves that rabbits may like to eat.
Located in Media / / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image Troff document Forget-me-not
Forget-me-nots (Myosotis spp.) are perennial plants that spread easily. They self seed and thrive in shady spots but can adapt to full sun. The plants are non-toxic but rabbits seem to leave them alone
Located in Media / / Plants / Garden plants and vegetables
Image JPEG image Germander speedwell
Germander speedwell (Veronica chamaedrys) is a low growing plant that is commonly found in gardens and grassland. It is not harmful for rabbits although it is not particularly palatable either. It is not worth searching for.
Located in Media / / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image Goose grass
Goose grass (Gallium aparine) is also know as 'cleavers' or 'stickyweed' is common in hedgerows. It's long stems often grows over nettles. Although rabbits may enjoy eating the plant, it is not easy to handle. There is a risk of being stung by nettles and covering your clothes in sticky seeds. There are easier plants to pick. The easiest time to pick it is in early spring as it starts to grow.
Located in Media / / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Great Willowherb
Great Willowherb (Epilobium hirsutum) is a tall plant that is common in hedgerows and on waste ground. It is not toxic and can be fed to rabbits although they do not always eat it.
Located in Media / / Plants / Wild plants and trees