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Image JPEG image Cow parsley stems
The stems of cow parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris) are different from poison hemlock (Conium maculatum). They are ridged and slightly hairy with no blotches. In cross section, the stems have a longitudinal ridge in them (like celery).
Located in Media / / Plants / Favourite plants
Image JPEG image Cow Parsley flowers
These are the flowers of Cow Parsley (Anthriscus sylvestris).
Located in Media / / Plants / Favourite plants
Image JPEG image Herb Robert
Herb Robert (Geranium robertianum) is common on waste ground and hedgerows. It can grow well in some parts of UK. It is enjoyed by rabbits and an easy plant to dry and store.
Located in Media / / Plants / Favourite plants
Image Troff document Forget-me-not
Forget-me-nots (Myosotis spp.) are perennial plants that spread easily. They self seed and thrive in shady spots but can adapt to full sun. The plants are non-toxic but rabbits seem to leave them alone
Located in Media / / Plants / Garden plants and vegetables
Image JPEG image Alexanders
Alexanders (Smyrnium olusatrum) or Horse parsley can be found around the coast. It is not a widespread plant and should on be picked in moderation. It is non toxic and edible for humans and should be safe for rabbits although I have no experience of it.
Located in Media / / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Angelica
Angelica (Angelica sylvestris) is a short lived perennial that can be found growing in damp meadows, ditches and wet woodlands. It is a tall robust plant that can grow over one metre in height. The white flowers are tinged with red and the stems are purple. It is not toxic.
Located in Media / / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Angelica flowers
Located in Media / / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Angelica stems
The stems of Wild Angelica (Angelica sylvestris) are smooth, hairless and hollow but , unlike hemlock, they are a deep purple colour.
Located in Media / / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Birch leaves
Several types of birch tree (Betula spp.) are found in UK. These leaves are of from a Downy birch tree (Betula pubescens). The leaves and non toxic but not a favourite with rabbits. The branches and twigs may be offered for them to gnaw on.
Located in Media / / Plants / Wild plants and trees
Image JPEG image Blackthorn
Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa) is a commin hedgerow plant. It produces purple berries (sloes). The stems have vicious spines. The leaves are suitable for feeding rabbits although it varies in palatibility. Suitable for drying for winter.
Located in Media / / Plants / Wild plants and trees